Contacts

92 Bowery St., NY 10013

thepascal@mail.com

+1 800 123 456 789

Tag: mental health

BlogNewsStories

Nature is within reach

Did you know that connecting with nature is hugely beneficial for supporting our mental health? Spending time in nature can help us be physically active, reduce our blood pressure, boost our mood, and increase our vitamin D levels – all of which have positive impacts on our mental wellbeing.

Living in Dorset we are blessed with many opportunities to get outside – from a walk, ride or cycle in the countryside; a wander along a river, coast path, or beach; a visit to a local urban park or a nature reserve; playing and exploring outdoors or spending time in a garden at home or planting a window box. Most people have access to some form of natural space, which we can engage with, either on our own, or with family and friends, and many opportunities are free.

Relax and focus

There is increasing evidence that being in nature supports our mental wellbeing by allowing us to relax and focus on the environment around us and provides spaces to be physically active. One study showed that those exercising outdoors do so for 30 minutes more than those at a gym. This may be down to the variety of experiences that being outdoors gives, such as the changing seasons and the weather. These factors may also help us to repeat the activity so that it becomes a habit because it’s always a little bit different, even if it’s in the same outdoor space.

And we don’t have to be consciously ‘exercising’ to get the benefits. Conservation volunteering gets us active and also supports or improves our mental wellbeing. A study showed a 95% improvement for attendees with low wellbeing after attending conservation volunteering activities after a period of six weeks*.

Birdsong therapy

But connection to nature doesn’t have to mean being active. Listening to birdsong or the wind through the trees on a stroll or sitting in a park or garden; or watching bees buzzing and butterflies flittering about focuses our attention and connects us to our surroundings as well as bringing us into the present moment, which is very beneficial to our wellbeing.

Not everyone may be able to easily access natural spaces or feel confident in what to do to help them connect to nature, so a fantastic online resource has been created called Picnic in the Parks. Developed by Dorset Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and partners, the website includes wildlife webcams across Dorset, videos of beautiful landscapes and audio journeys. The website also includes opportunities to connect to nature through arts activities and guides on activities to get involved with for those who can access our amazing environments. Get inspired with the Picnic in the Parks website at: www.picnicintheparks.org

While connecting to nature isn’t a fix all in terms of having good mental health, it can really help support our wellbeing. So why not do something that connects you to nature which in one way of another is within reach.

* Essex University and The Wildlife Trusts: https://bit.ly/2vNeZ6i
BlogNewsStories

Jon’s story

Jon Bartlett moved to North Dorset recently and was surprised how easy it was to access the mental health support that he needed.

Whilst I was looking forward to moving back to my home county, I was also nervous. What would the care for my mental health be like? It had taken a long time to get a good treatment regime in my old county – one which, like Dorset, was heavily skewed by a large urban area at one end and rural districts elsewhere.

I registered at my new GP and found that the doctors had seen my records and booked time to speak with me and welcome me to their surgery, whilst checking what specialist support I might need for my mental health. I was anxious as I spoke to a new GP but they set me at my ease quickly (often tricky by phone) and outlined what they would do next and where I should look to find some community supports. By the end of the same day I had a call from the community mental health team and a couple of days later the social prescribing team had called to connect me up with peer support groups and various activities in the district.

As someone with a long-established diagnosis, skilled in managing it and on a stable medication, I didn’t need all the help that was offered but I was genuinely surprised how many groups/events were going on. There seemed to be something for everyone and certainly plenty of people ready and willing to help. We hear all the time about waiting lists and delays in mental health services and those things are undoubtedly still an issue but the service is full of staff who care and furthermore, there are plenty of people in the community to help you on a day to day basis.

So please, remember that support is within your reach in Dorset.

Find out more about the Light On Within Reach campaign and support available in rural Dorset

BlogNewsStories

New rural campaign launches

New Within Reach mental health campaign is launched to support people in rural Dorset

Almost a quarter of Dorset’s population live in rural areas and, for those who are struggling or facing mental health difficulties, that can sometimes feel isolating. Research indicates that suicide rates nationally are higher in rural communities, so Dorset’s Suicide Prevention Group has launched a new campaign to remind people that wherever you are, and whatever you’re facing, support is always within reach.

Simply talking to someone about what you’re going through can make a huge difference. And however difficult it might seem, there is always someone to turn to.

Trevor Cligg is a farmer in West Dorset who has faced mental health difficulties: “A lot of people out there are struggling. Some withdraw and others, like myself, hide in plain sight. But talking about it is the biggest thing you can do to help – to whoever, be it your family, your friends, counsellors, doctors. Just talk about it.”

If you don’t feel comfortable talking to friends or family, you can speak to your GP or contact any of these free support services, which are on-hand to help 24/7:

  • Dorset’s NHS mental health helpline Connection – call 0800 652 0190

  • Samaritans – call 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org and someone will get back to you within 24 hours

  • Text ‘SHOUT’ to 85258 for confidential support via text message

Sophia Callaghan, Public Health Consultant at Public Health Dorset, is the co-chair of Dorset’s Suicide Prevention Group: “Dorset has some wonderful rural communities but if you’re having a tough time, it might feel like help is far away,” she explains. “Our Suicide Prevention Group works in partnership to help those in crisis and signpost to the support that is available across our county – because wherever you are, you’re never alone.”

“Help is always available, whether it’s through a friend or family member, your doctor, or simply a listening ear on a helpline. You can also contact Dorset’s brilliant social prescribers through your GP surgery to access activities and support in your area. You might be surprised at what’s happening nearby – there are wellbeing activities, friendly groups and drop-in services across Dorset.

Suzanne Green, Programme Lead for Mental Health at NHS Dorset, urged people to look out for others too: “It can be tough for people to admit they’re struggling. If you’re worried about someone, don’t be afraid to ask how they are. And remember, we often say we’re fine when we’re not, so ask again if you’re worried. Even if they don’t want to open up then and there, they’ll still know you’re there for them.

“The Samaritans have some great advice on how to spot when someone is struggling, how to support others and how to listen at www.samaritans.org”.

Find out more about the Within Reach campaign, as well as support and wellbeing activities in some of Dorset’s rural communities, at www.lightonmh.uk/withinreach

As part of the campaign, Dorset’s Suicide Prevention Group is offering free mental health awareness training in Broadwindsor and Gillingham. If you are interested in the training, please email phdcomms@dorsetcouncil.gov.uk

Find out more about the Light On Within Reach campaign and support available in rural Dorset.

BlogNewsStories

Mental Health First Aid and ALGEE

Enrolling on training courses to gain knowledge and new skills is something I have always enjoyed. After all, ‘learning’ is one of the Five Ways to Wellbeing and taking part in ongoing learning opportunities throughout our lives can really help to improve self-esteem and make us feel good.

When the chance came to take part in a Mental Health First Aid Course (MHFA) through Dorset Mind, I didn’t think twice about putting my name down. I had heard very good things about the training. I wanted to be able to learn essential skills that may help somebody who is in a crisis, and maybe even help to save a life. Sometimes we might go on a course and never be in a situation whereby we need to use the skills acquired. But those skills are always there, banked within us so we can be prepared and ready to take appropriate action.

Just in case

Earlier this year, I experienced one of those ‘just in case’ situations, but this particular situation was a crisis moment for an individual. I was in a circumstance where I needed to remain calm and put what I learnt on the MHFA course into practice. This was real life and is why we offer these courses.

It was on an early morning in mid summer that I decided to get up and out on my bike before starting the working day. This is something I do on a regular basis, but not something I had planned to do that day… although I am so glad I did.

I hadn’t been out long before I noticed an individual sitting on the floor and seeming a little upset. I could have cycled past and not thought much of it, but I didn’t. Something wasn’t right, I had a sense that this person may not be ok and I had to stop. That was the right thing to do. This person was in distress and appeared to be a moment of crisis. I sat down at a distance and began a conversation, making sure to respect their space and to show I was there to listen and help. All the time I was there, my priority was to ensure the individual was safe. I was thinking back to my training, going over what I learnt and trying to be as calm as possible.

As the time went on, the individual talked more and more and the best thing I could do was to listen. Just listen to them, acknowledge how they were feeling and when appropriate, I gave signposting information that might be helpful. I waited there until they made the first move to show they were ready to come away from the situation and we parted ways in a much more positive and forward thinking manner. I was confident I’d helped diverted a crisis.

The ALGEE method

Upon reflection and thinking back to this situation, the ALGEE action plan we were taught in the MHFA course had been put into practice:

  • Assess – the situation was assessed for any signs of suicide or harm
  • Listen – listening played a huge part in this situation
  • Give – information and reassurance to the individual
  • Encourage – where to find appropriate professional help
  • Encourage – support strategies and other methods of self-help

I am so thankful that I was in the right place at the right time on this particular day.

And I will be eternally grateful for the skills and knowledge I learnt on the Mental Health First Aid Course. Going through the training and applying what was learnt helped me to stay calm and know what to do in this situation.

I would recommend anyone to do this course if you have the opportunity; it can enhance your life and make a real difference to somebody else; you never know when you might need to put the skills and learning into practice.

Help and Support

If you are in crisis, ring 999 or the Samaritans free on 116 123. Visit our help and support pages for resources, signposting, and information about our individual and group mental health services.

Our guest blogger:

Huge thanks to our blogger, who prefers to remain anonymous. They received MHFA Training from our Training Team – details of which you can find here.

Find out more about Dorset Mind’s work click here

BlogNewsStories

Bipolar and me

TRIGGER WARNING: This blog mentions bipolar disorder and may be upsetting in nature. If you need to talk to someone after reading this article, please call the Samaritans FREE on 116 123, 24/7.

What is Bipolar?

Bipolar is a serious mental Health illness that affects your mood. It causes a person to experience manic or depressive episodes as well as some psychotic symptoms during these episodes. 

Bipolar is one of the UK’s most common long term conditions, with almost as many people living with Bipolar as cancer. It is estimated that 1.3 million people in the UK live with Bipolar, that’s 1 in 50 people. It’s also worth noting that 56% of people with Bipolar in the UK are undiagnosed, indicating it’s prevalence.  

World Bipolar Day takes place on 30th March every year. To mark it this year, we’ve a special blog from one of our own staff, Dan.

Dan’s experience…

I have Bipolar Affective Disorder and have struggled with it for 20 years.

I used to work full-time in a busy office and figured that I was happy enough with my life.

Since 2017, I had a number of stressful events in my life which triggered various manic and depressive episodes.

I’ve had problems with my mood since my early twenties, but I was not diagnosed until much later in life. 

Following one major depressive episode at the age of 26, I was prescribed antidepressants by a psychiatrist and entered a major manic episode. Unfortunately, despite my symptoms, this wasn’t picked up. Being untreated for bipolar, the episodes continued, cycling between mania and depression for many years. 

I think the main reason that I was not diagnosed was that I held down a successful, sometimes stressful job throughout and managed a relatively stable life from anyone looking in.  

Mania

As I got older, my manic and depressive episodes began to last longer and became more severe. I was still prescribed antidepressants but not diagnosed. 

My friends, colleagues and I began to suspect that my mood swings may be an indication of bipolar, but unfortunately a number of mental health professionals were dismissive of my views. 

During another major depressive episode, one particular psychiatrist listened to my history. He tentatively diagnosed me with bipolar affective disorder, type II. It was difficult as he had not seen me during a manic episode. This time, I was prescribed a mood stabiliser along with an antidepressant, which helped for a time. 

Various major life events precipitated a manic episode, always followed by many months of depression, and I just about managed. Still, the manic episodes in particular began to worsen over time. 

During my most severe manic episode, at the age of 39, I experienced many symptoms. My spending was out of control. I would talk to anybody and made many new friends. People couldn’t keep up with my speech – I would flit from one subject to another constantly. I conceived a number of business ideas which at the time were unrealistic. I would be so busy running around doing different things, I would have up to thirty calendar entries in my phone that I wanted to achieve that day. Clearly, I never did. I barely slept – one or two hours a night and long periods without any sleep – but I somehow remained functional.

Sectioned

I was finally sectioned under the Mental Health Act. 

Being detained in an acute psychiatric unit was the best experience in my life when it came to my mental health. I received medical intervention in the form of an antipsychotic and two mood stabilisers. All of the staff were brilliant and easy to talk to. The structured day helped an awful lot and I found it much easier to sleep. After some weeks the mania subsided and the racing thoughts in my head began to ease. 

Following my release, I still entered a depression but it became easier to manage with the right medication and regular visits to my psychiatrist. 

In the early part of 2021 I decided I wanted to try something new. Having an interest in mental health, I joined Dorset Mind as a volunteer for The GAP Project in Dorchester. Just being outside, connecting with nature and helping others has had an enormously beneficial impact on my mental wellbeing.

In September 2021, an opportunity arose to work for Dorset Mind as a Coordinator for the new GAP Project in Weymouth and I am very proud of the work we have done so far.

I can honestly say that since joining Dorset Mind I am enjoying the most stable, peaceful and happy period for most of my adult life.

This is a far cry from the office environment I once worked in and I would highly recommend the GAP Project for anyone who is struggling with their mental health for whatever reason and who wishes to improve their mental wellbeing. 

Our Guest Blogger

Huge thanks to Dan Bradshaw for sharing his incredible personal journey. and how working with The GAP Project and connecting with nature has helped him on his recovery journey. 

Help and Support

The GAP Project is Dorset Mind’s ecotherapy project, of which Dan is working on. Find out more about the benefits of Ecotherapy and how you can get involved here.

Bipolar UK is a national charity that specialises in supporting people with bipolar.

BlogNews

The importance of Independent Custody Visitors

As I write, I am honoured to have been nominated for an MBE by Her Majesty, for services to Mental Health Awareness and Support.

This Honour cannot be accepted, or spoken about, without thinking of Independent Custody Visitors (ICVs) and my team at the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner, Dorset.

As I said in my blog this week to the Independent Custody Visitors (ICVs) – they have all stepped up to the plate, and more- protecting people’s rights and dignities, in incredibly difficult circumstances. I thank them all and the team at the Organisation I Chair, the Independent Custody Visiting Association (ICVA) Ashley, Sherry and Stacey.

In relation to my role as Police and Crime CC As the PCC for Dorset, leading nationally for Custody and Mental Health issues, I travelled a seven-year journey to improve outcomes for people detained by the police who were experiencing a mental health crisis for their own safety.

Many of you will know my two sayings – “If you break your arm, you should go to A&E, if you break your mind, you should go to mental health professionals“.

And my other saying – “People in mental health crisis deserve the right treatment at the right time, in the right place“. That place was never going to be a police cell.

Sadly, back in 2012/13, over 9,000 people in England and Wales ended up in custody suites, being visited by volunteers, instead of being in a health setting.

There were numerous reasons for this, and between us all, we changed things for the better. We worked together to tighten the Mental Health Act so that police cells are no longer deemed as an intuitive place of safety for people experiencing a mental health crisis.  This year, less than 200 people were taken to police stations for being in crisis, a massive drop that reflects a positive step-change in how the police treat those with poor mental health.

Throughout this journey our ICVs, lobbied me for change and encouraged me to take the matter to the Government. I must single out the Rt Hon Theresa May, as Home Secretary, for her enormous energy in this space, and I must thank all my PCC colleagues, who signed a letter to the Government in 2013 saying: “enough is enough”.

Locally and nationally, things have improved in other ways, with new Retreats, Community Hubs, and a 24 hr Crisis Line in Dorset, and nationally, a standard health approach to people now entering custody, where detainees are assessed for their physical and mental health on arrival.

There is much to be proud of, and I am humbled by this recognition, but I am also humbled by all of you, constantly out there, checking, questioning, and examining policing as they undertake essential custody work, as well as being a listening ear for detainees.

Let’s celebrate together, we journeyed together, and let’s hope this year sees a better, safer place for all of us.

Thanks for all that you do!