Contacts

92 Bowery St., NY 10013

thepascal@mail.com

+1 800 123 456 789

News

PASSIONATE ABOUT IMPROVING LIVES

Suicide Prevention  

One of the founding principles of the Dorset Community Mental Health Alliance (DCMHA) is to tackle the tragic rate of suicide in Dorset. Every suicide in our community is a tragedy – for the life that is lost, for the family, friends and loved ones and for the ripple effect that each has on our society. 

All 38 organisations that belong to the DCMHA are dedicated to doing everything in their power to make a difference and to bring that number down. 

What are we doing to help? 

Firstly, we have made sure that everyone knows where to signpost someone in crisis, or who says they are having suicidal thoughts. If someone comes to any of us with a life-or-death crisis the right course of action is to call 999 or signpost them to The Samaritans or NHS Connection – a 24/7 FREE helpline. 

But we don’t want our responsibility to end there. 

  • The DCMHA has made suicide prevention training a key target this autumn. We’re taking part in a pilot project being run by our partners at Public Health Dorset (PHD) and we hope to roll out that training to as many members as possible between now and Christmas. Every member has already received a link for online training from Public Health England and Zero Suicide Alliance. 
  • We are learning lessons from the life-saving Real-Time Surveillance work that is being done by Public Health Dorset. This is helping our conversations about how we can come together to prevent more suicides with data that is current and relevant (the data we were working on last year was more than two years old). 
  • We are talking to the inspirational Alice Hendy, who set up R;pple Suicide Prevention in the wake of her brother Josh’s suicide late last year. R;pple is an online monitoring tool designed to flash a message of hope and support to anyone who searches harmful keywords or phrases on the PC. It takes a few minutes to get any PC protected. For more details, visit R;pple Suicide Prevention 
  • We are developing a blueprint for a Suicide Prevention Strategy, with the help of Bournemouth University and Dorset Healthcare NHS Trust, which will help members to ensure they have a framework in place, both for staff and volunteers, to prevent suicide from within their own organisations and for their service users, clients and participants. 
  • We are looking at ways for our members to help colleagues within the CCG and Public Health find solutions for people who repeatedly present to emergency services because they have attempted to take their own lives. This is a complex and ongoing project potentially involving a lot of different organisations from the NHS, Local Authorities, Police, GPs and the Voluntary Sector.  

It’s worth saying that every tragic life lost costs the country around £1.5M, so although the human cost is more important, there is a financial cost too.

Our other work 

Health Inequality Mental health inequalities are deeply rooted in our Society. We are supporting Community Action Network (CAN), Dorset Community Action (DCA) and Dorset Race Equality Council (DREC) with a Health Equality Partnership Project. The project has been commissioned by PHD and the NHS’s Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), to gather community insights and identify any areas of hidden health inequality that people with enduring mental health, learning disabilities and ethnic minority groups face. 

We’re sure our members can provide insight and help the project to engage with people with lived experience and find out the barriers they are facing when using preventative health services, including mental health. 

NHS Reforms We’ve also been discussing how best we can work with the new Integrated Care System’s Mental Health Programme Board (MHPB), which comes into force in April next year as part of a raft of NHS Reforms. We will work with the MHPB to ensure the provision of mental health services in the county meets everyone’s needs. 

Community Mental Health Transformation Members are also keen to support the work of the Mental Health Integrated Community Care Project (MHICC). This project recognises that primary and community mental health services can’t always meet everyone’s needs and so large scale ‘transformation’ of these services is necessary. So we have been discussing how the Voluntary Sector, and in particular our members, can contribute to the success of this ambitious programme of work. For more details go to dorsetccg.nhs.uk/cmh/  

If you want to join us, please contact Nick Rowe at  nick.rowe@dorsetmind.uk or fill out the form dcmha.uk/join/  on this site. 

Dorset Community Mental Health Alliance – Working together for Dorset’s wellbeing. 

 

News

HOW DOES COUNSELLING WORK?

At Relate Dorset and South Wiltshire, we are here to help. 

Whether you are having problems with a relationship or you’d just like to understand your partner/family/friends better, talking things through with one of our counsellors can make a real difference. 

The counselling we offer is for everyone.  Whether you’re married, single, young, old, living together or apart, straight or gay, we can help you strengthen your relationships and help with other issues such as anxiety or depression.  Counselling offers a caring, confidential and supportive environment in which you can examine problems and think about ways to address them.  

The first step is to arrange an initial appointment to discuss what the issues are that you need help with.  This gives you the chance to see if counselling is for you and us the chance to make sure we are the best people to help you.   

From there, if everyone agrees, ongoing appointments can be arranged with either the same counsellor or a new one who will be briefed on what was discussed at the initial appointment.  Once you start ongoing appointments with a counsellor, you will stay with that counsellor.  There is no set number of appointments you must have – that is up to you and your counsellor to agree as you go along – but six-eight sessions are common. 

Appointments last between 45 – 50 minutes and can take place either face-to-face, via webcam, or over the phone, depending on your circumstances and what works best for you.   

Our counsellors offer appointments on a range of days and times, so hopefully, there will be something that works for you.  

Our friendly team of administrators are the contact point outside of appointments and will take you through the process described above and book all the appointments, talking through availability and costs with you. 

For more information about Relate Dorset and South Wiltshire, visit  https://www.relate.org.uk/dorset-south-wiltshire  

News

A GENUINE DESIRE TO HELP

Wendy Thompson is Senior Practitioner at BCHA’s new Community Front Room (CFR) in Weymouth. In her blog, Wendy shares her passion for supporting people with their mental health issues and the positive strategies she uses.  

Community Front Rooms are a new service, which form part of Dorset HealthCare’s Access Mental Health initiative, which provides drop-in support to anyone over the age of 18 requiring support with their mental health. CFRs are open Thursday to Sunday, from 3.15 pm – 10.45 pm.  

“My role involves engaging with the customers who attend our sessions, as well as working closely with other agencies in the community, working together to help deliver the message that help is available and no referral is required – people can call us or just drop in (from Thursday 17 June 2021). 

“We have a team of peer specialists and mental health recovery workers, who are all kind and compassionate people, willing to go the extra mile to support people.  

“We recognise that while mental health illness can be complex, we are committed to normalising it in the same way that our physical health is regarded. We need to acknowledge and recognise that at times we may all require support and there is no shame in that.  

“Sometimes it can be difficult talking to those closest to us as we feel we are burdening them, so talking to someone neutral really helps. We are able to give people a safe space to visit and talk or just be in the company of others to engage in activities that can offer distraction and connection. 

“My favourite part of this role is having the autonomy to be creative in the delivery of the service and being able to make a difference in the lives of others.  

“Fundamentally, I can be myself and draw upon my own previous work and life experience to make a difference in my own local community.  

“I started my working life over 20 years ago as a very anxious single mum. But by being given the opportunity to volunteer at a local drug and alcohol agency I was able build my confidence and gain employment as a Substance Misuse Recovery worker and to work within the community and the criminal justice system.  

“More recently I moved over to working within mental health. If someone had told me years ago that I would be doing what I’m doing now I honestly would never have believed them. What I love about my job, is that now I can support people in the same way I was supported and share with people strategies that can support their wellbeing, confidence and self-esteem. 

“I have contact every day with customers and other agencies. Throughout the pandemic, we made use of virtual support through the attend anywhere provision.  

“COVID has been hard for us all in different ways, leaving us with feelings of isolation, as well as with financial issues, while juggling home working and childcare. We’ve had to work through relationship breakdowns and bereavement, so having the opportunity to talk is so valuable as otherwise we can just be left with our own thoughts, which can be a very lonely place to be.  

“Through a genuine desire to help, as well as the ability to listen with kindness and friendliness, I can help people see things from a different perspective and find a way forward. This may include referral to connect with activities within the local community and/or referral to more specialised support. 

“What excites me most about my job is connecting with a vast array of people in the community. I give people hope when they or their loved ones are struggling.  

“I am passionate about breaking down the stigma and shame surrounding mental health issues and helping people to understand that we all have mental health worries.  

“I hope to be able to promote a better understanding of what the symptoms are that people are struggling with and to ensure that they have a safe place to visit, whether it’s to request support for their own wellbeing or to seek advice about how to support a colleague, loved one or friend.” 

Further information about the Community Front Rooms is available on the Dorset HealthCare Access Mental Health website: https://www.dorsethealthcare.nhs.uk/access-mental-health  

News

IMPROVING LIVES IN DORSET

It has been great to be part of the Dorset Disability Equality Forum, and work alongside like-minded people who are committed to improving experiences for local people with disabilities, and those visiting the area.  

It’s really important to have opportunities to collaborate and develop solutions, as everyone has something to contribute – this has been very clear with the work alongside Dorset Council’s updated taxi policy, where both physical health and mental health considerations were identified. 

We’ve been working with the Forum to better support our patients, staff and local communities, inviting some of our staff networks and patient groups to information sessions to learn more about the Forum’s purpose and ambitions.  

With many links throughout the county and beyond, working with the Dorset Disability Equality Forum allows us to meet local people who may access our services, and empower our colleagues who can constructively contribute to the important topics discussed. 

Harry Coburn,   

Equality, Diversity & Inclusion Practitioner, Dorset Healthcare University NHS Foundation Trust